Innovative Discoveries Series

Beyond ‘rants,’ ‘raves,’ and ‘reputation:’ Using patient comments to improve care

Improving patient experience is a goal of many health systems, but closed-ended survey questions do not give insight into the cause of patient concerns nor do they offer solutions. Patient comments (in the form of online reviews, responses to open-ended survey questions, or solicited narratives), in contrast, give a roadmap for improvement, but are challenging to use. This talk will examine the benefits and limitations of online patients comments, identify how various types of patients comments are currently being used to improve care and investigate strategies for using patient comments to inform quality improvement activities.

Presented By:

Tara Lagu, MD

Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School/Baystate Medical Center
Associate Director, the Institute for Healthcare Delivery and Population Science

Free!  Lunch will be served!

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Friday, November 16, 2018
Noon to 1 p.m.
In-person: Christiana Hospital, Room 1100
Online: Watch live at https://bluejeans.com/361095905
Or join meeting ID 361095905 on the BlueJeans app on your smartphone or tablet

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

Upcoming Lectures:

November 30, 2018: Statin use is associated with lower osteoarthritis occurrence in the Delaware population
December 14, 2018: Primary Care of Infants with In-utero Opioid Exposure

Statement on Vaccines

Vaccines Continue to be Tested and Proven Safe

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2017). American Academy of Pediatrics Emphasizes Safety and Importance of Vaccines. Retrieved from https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/American-Academy-of-Pediatrics-Emphasizes-Safety-and-Importance-of-Vaccines.aspx

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016). Infant Immunizations FAQs. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html

Institute of Medicine. (2004). Immunization Safety Review: Vaccines and Autism. Retrieved from https://www.nap.edu/catalog/10997/immunization-safety-review-vaccines-and-autism

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2015).  Thimerosal in Vaccines: Questions and Answers. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/QuestionsaboutVaccines/UCM070430#q5

In light of recent claims by politicians or appointees that vaccines are linked to autism, or are unsafe when administered according to the recommended schedule, or contain dangerous products like Thimerosal, the public health community and the Delaware Academy of Medicine/Delaware Public Health Association continue to come down on the side of science.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research is responsible for regulating vaccines in the United States.  Before a vaccine can be licensed for public use, it must be tested for safety in the laboratory, in animals, and in human clinical trials.  Human clinical trials include looking for common adverse events in a few participants (phase 1), several hundred volunteers looking for local reactions and general side effects like fever (phase 2), and establishing the effectiveness of the vaccine and determining less common side effects with thousands of participants (phase 3).  If a vaccine is to be given at the same time as another vaccine, the two vaccines are tested together (FDA, 2015).  If a dangerous effect is found, that vaccine is not licensed for public use.

Vaccines are continuously monitored following licensure by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), which is run by both the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).  The VAERS is a national system that collects all reports of adverse events following vaccination.  Phase 4 clinical studies are also conducted to further evaluate the new vaccine, and population based studies are conducted through the use of databases like the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) for the lifetime of the use of the vaccine (FDA, 2015).

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Immunization Safety Review Committee “favors rejection of a causal relationship between thimerosal-containing vaccines and autism” (IOM, 2004).  Despite this finding, “all vaccines routinely recommended for children 6 years of age or younger and marketed in the U.S. contain no thimerosal or only trace amounts” (FDA, 2015).

“Infants and young children who follow immunization schedules that spread out shots – or leave out shots – are at risk of developing diseases during the time that shots are delayed” (CDC, 2016). Vaccines “keep communities healthy, and protect some of the most vulnerable in our society” (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2017).  The Delaware Academy of Medicine will continue to advocate for vaccines and vaccine use in the state of Delaware and the United States.

CCHS Global Health Residency Track

GLOBAL HEALTH SERIES

Please join us for this month’s global health talk!
The Global Health Residency Tracks of Christiana Care Health System, in partnership with the Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association, are pleased to invite you to this month’s global health talk.

Thursday, November 15, 2018
5:30 – 6:30 pm
LIVE: Ammon Medical Education Center Main Auditorium (broadcast to Room 2 in the Brandywine Conference Center at Wilmington Hospital).

Reduction in Maternal Mortality Through Advances in Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage

Postpartum hemorrhage remains a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. This talk presents an overview of this major global health issue, and key innovations from around the world. For the past decade, a large global research group has been conducting research and sharing best practices worldwide. Funded by the NIH and foundations, these innovations have helped shape MCH and GH policy.  Our group will have recently presented several papers on this topic at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA).  We invite you to hear these updates, targeted at all levels of learners, professionals, and staff in the Christiana Care community.

Speaker:
Professor Shivaprasad Goudar
JN Medical College, India

Co-Hosts:
Dr. Matthew Hoffman
Dr. Omar Khan

REGISTER ONLINE

The CCHS Global Health Curriculum is an interdepartmental collaboration, supporting the Global Health Tracks in the Depts. of Medicine and Family Medicine, and the Med-Peds Residency, with the support of the Delaware Academy of Medicine, Delaware Public Health Association, and Delaware Academy of Family Physicians.

All are welcome to attend this talk.  Global Health Curriculum residents are required to attend.  There is no charge to attend this event, but registration is required. Food and Refreshments will be served.

Future Talks