Lecture Series @ Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Spring 2019

 

 

 

 

Spring 2019 Semester begins Tuesday, February 12th!
Class time: 9:00 – 10:15 am
Register Online: http://www.olli.udel.edu/wilmington/registration/

February 12, 2019
Obstructive Sleep Apnea:  Contemporary Surgical Management
Dan Meara, MD, DMD

February 19, 2019
Exercise and Aging
Taylor Alger, PT

February 26, 2019
Trauma – Case Presentations and a Focus on Falls
Sandra Medinilla, MD, MPH

March 5, 2019
Early Language Acquisition and Cognitive Development
Giovanna Morini, Ph.D.

March 12, 2019
Addiction is a Disease of the Brain
Vishesh Agarwal, MD

March 19, 2019
Nanomedicine and Gene Regulation
Emily Day, Ph.D.

March 26, 2019
Kidney 101
John Swanson, MD

April 2, 2019
SPRING BREAK

April 9, 2019
Polypharmacy and its Management
Amanda Schartel, PharmD and Sean Thomas, PharmD

April 16, 2019
Scope of Practice for Physician Assistants, and a focus on Atrial Fibrillation and its Treatment
Ed Woodford, PA

April 23, 2019
View from the Cabinet Secretary’s Office – Healthcare in Delaware
Kara Odom-Walker, MD, MPH, MSHS

April 30, 2019
In Vitro Blood Brain Barrier for cutting edge research and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s)
John Ruano-Salguero, BS

May 7, 2019
Data Privacy and Your Health Information
Ryan Keating, JD

May 14, 2019
Delaware Healthcare Commission Roles and Responsibilities
Elisabeth Scheneman, MA

Mini Med 2018 On YouTube!

Did you miss 2018’s Mini Medical School? Watch it on YouTube!

The 2018 Mini Medical School program, a collaboration between the Delaware Academy of Medicine and Christiana Care Health System, concluded in April, with six lectures and hundreds of eager-to-learn attendees. For the first time in the annual program’s history, the lectures have been captured on video and are now available for viewing on YouTube.

Watch here!

Innovative Discoveries Series

Geriatric Low Back Pain: Managing Influences, Experiences, and Consequences

The overarching goal of our research program is to improve physical function and participation in older adults with chronic musculoskeletal conditions, particularly low back pain (LBP). Despite the fact that LBP is a common problem for older adults and is associated with poor outcomes in this vulnerable age group, little research has focused on LBP in people over age 65. With minimal research available, clinicians do not have clear evidence-based guidance regarding management of older adults with LBP.  This presentation will focus on our pathway towards developing a focused treatment algorithm designed to prevent and address the pain-related disability found in older adults with LBP. Our work has largely focused on the identification of potentially modifiable “rehabilitation risk factors” that are associated with functional limitations, as well as the development of interventions to address these risk factors. Specifically, we will discuss our findings relative to trunk muscle impairments, clinical hip impairments and energetic impairments in the context of the older adult with chronic low back pain.

Presented By:

Gregory E. Hicks, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Chair and Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware”
Associate Editor; The Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences
Editorial Board; Pain Medicine

Free!  Lunch will be served!

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Friday, March 1, 2019
Noon to 1 p.m.
In-person: Christiana Hospital,Room 1100
Online: Watch live at https://bluejeans.com/361095905
Or join meeting ID 361095905 on the BlueJeans app on your smartphone or tablet

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

Upcoming Lectures:

March 15, 2019: Diet and Vascular Function

Delaware Mini Medical School

Designed for individuals who want to gain a deeper understanding of the world of medicine, Mini-Medical School is a free, six-week series of lectures for adults of all ages and high school students co-sponsored with Christiana Care Health System. Attendees learn about important trends in diagnosing and treating illness and …

Statement on Vaccines

Vaccines Continue to be Tested and Proven Safe

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2017). American Academy of Pediatrics Emphasizes Safety and Importance of Vaccines. Retrieved from https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/American-Academy-of-Pediatrics-Emphasizes-Safety-and-Importance-of-Vaccines.aspx

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016). Infant Immunizations FAQs. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html

Institute of Medicine. (2004). Immunization Safety Review: Vaccines and Autism. Retrieved from https://www.nap.edu/catalog/10997/immunization-safety-review-vaccines-and-autism

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2015).  Thimerosal in Vaccines: Questions and Answers. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/QuestionsaboutVaccines/UCM070430#q5

In light of recent claims by politicians or appointees that vaccines are linked to autism, or are unsafe when administered according to the recommended schedule, or contain dangerous products like Thimerosal, the public health community and the Delaware Academy of Medicine/Delaware Public Health Association continue to come down on the side of science.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research is responsible for regulating vaccines in the United States.  Before a vaccine can be licensed for public use, it must be tested for safety in the laboratory, in animals, and in human clinical trials.  Human clinical trials include looking for common adverse events in a few participants (phase 1), several hundred volunteers looking for local reactions and general side effects like fever (phase 2), and establishing the effectiveness of the vaccine and determining less common side effects with thousands of participants (phase 3).  If a vaccine is to be given at the same time as another vaccine, the two vaccines are tested together (FDA, 2015).  If a dangerous effect is found, that vaccine is not licensed for public use.

Vaccines are continuously monitored following licensure by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), which is run by both the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).  The VAERS is a national system that collects all reports of adverse events following vaccination.  Phase 4 clinical studies are also conducted to further evaluate the new vaccine, and population based studies are conducted through the use of databases like the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) for the lifetime of the use of the vaccine (FDA, 2015).

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Immunization Safety Review Committee “favors rejection of a causal relationship between thimerosal-containing vaccines and autism” (IOM, 2004).  Despite this finding, “all vaccines routinely recommended for children 6 years of age or younger and marketed in the U.S. contain no thimerosal or only trace amounts” (FDA, 2015).

“Infants and young children who follow immunization schedules that spread out shots – or leave out shots – are at risk of developing diseases during the time that shots are delayed” (CDC, 2016). Vaccines “keep communities healthy, and protect some of the most vulnerable in our society” (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2017).  The Delaware Academy of Medicine will continue to advocate for vaccines and vaccine use in the state of Delaware and the United States.