Lecture Series @ Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Spring 2019

 

 

 

 

Spring 2019 Semester begins Tuesday, February 12th!
Class time: 9:00 – 10:15 am
Register Online: http://www.olli.udel.edu/wilmington/registration/

February 12, 2019
Obstructive Sleep Apnea:  Contemporary Surgical Management
Dan Meara, MD, DMD

February 19, 2019
Exercise and Aging
Taylor Alger, PT

February 26, 2019
Trauma – Case Presentations and a Focus on Falls
Sandra Medinilla, MD, MPH

March 5, 2019
Early Language Acquisition and Cognitive Development
Giovanna Morini, Ph.D.

March 12, 2019
Addiction is a Disease of the Brain
Vishesh Agarwal, MD

March 19, 2019
Nanomedicine and Gene Regulation
Emily Day, Ph.D.

March 26, 2019
Kidney 101
John Swanson, MD

April 2, 2019
SPRING BREAK

April 9, 2019
Polypharmacy and its Management
Amanda Schartel, PharmD and Sean Thomas, PharmD

April 16, 2019
Scope of Practice for Physician Assistants, and a focus on Atrial Fibrillation and its Treatment
Ed Woodford, PA

April 23, 2019
View from the Cabinet Secretary’s Office – Healthcare in Delaware
Kara Odom-Walker, MD, MPH, MSHS

April 30, 2019
In Vitro Blood Brain Barrier for cutting edge research and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s)
John Ruano-Salguero, BS

May 7, 2019
Data Privacy and Your Health Information
Ryan Keating, JD

May 14, 2019
Delaware Healthcare Commission Roles and Responsibilities
Elisabeth Scheneman, MA

Surgeon General’s Message on the Current Measles Outbreaks

Dear Partners,

The Nation’s Doctor would like to share a very important message with you about the current measles outbreaks occurring throughout our country.

Measles is a highly-contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Measles starts with a fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and sore throat, and is followed by a rash that spreads all over the body.

Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 9 out of 10 people around that person will also become infected if they’re not yet vaccinated. You can get measles just by being in a room where a person with measles has been, even up to two hours after that person has left.  And what is even more worrisome is that an infected person can spread measles to others even before the infected person develops symptoms—from four days before they develop the measles rash through four days afterwards.

The good news is that measles can be prevented with the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine.

The MMR vaccine has an excellent safety record and is highly effective. It is one of the most effective vaccines we have in our country.

Surgeon General Adams hopes you will share his message with your networks. It’s up to us to protect the health of our communities.

For more information, please visit CDC.gov

Office of the Surgeon General

Lt. Governor’s Challenge

Lt. Governor Bethany Hall-Long invites you to join the celebration as the state of Delaware kicks off the Lt. Governor’s Challenge — an ongoing opportunity for Delawareans to embrace healthier living, inspire their peers and be recognized for their achievements. More than a recognition program for health and wellness initiatives, the Lt. Governor’s Challenge is an opportunity for everyone to drive change and to elevate the well-being, productivity, and prosperity among communities in our state!

The Kickoff Celebration is a free public event, open to all individuals and groups in Delaware that are passionate about improving physical and emotional health through individual and communal activities.

When: Thursday, October 25 from 2:00 – 3:00 pm
Where: DE TURF Sports Complex | 4000 Bay Road | Frederica, DE 19946
Find the flyer here!

Kickoff Highlights

  • Remarks by the Lt. Governor!
  • Official reveal of the Lt. Governor’s Challenge vision and platform!
  • Preview of the Lt. Governor’s Challenge nomination and resource website!
  • Networking with state leaders in health and well-being!

Please RSVP by October 23 to info@ltgovernorschallenge.org

Flu Season

2018-2019 Flu Season

Check out the Division of Public Health’s Bulletin – Special Flu Edition to learn more about the flu.

Numerous flu clinics are scheduled across Delaware.  To find them:

Department of Public Health Flu Clinics

New Castle County

  • Monday to Friday | 8:15 am – 11:30 am | Hudson State Service Center | 501 Ogletown Road, Newark
  • Monday to Friday | 8:15 am – 11:30 am | Porter State Service Center | 509 W. 8th Street, Wilmington

Kent County

  • Monday (1:00 pm – 3:00 pm) & Wednesday (9:00 am – 11:00 am) | Milford State Service Center | 253 NE Front Street, Milford (By Appointment Only)
  • Monday to Thursday | 8:00 am – 3:30 pm | Williams State Service Center | 805 River Road, Dover (By Appointment Only)

Sussex County

  • Monday – Friday| 8:30 am – 4:00 pm | Shipley State Service Center | 350 Virginia Avenue, Seaford
  • Thursdays | 9:00 am – 11:00 am | Adams State Service Center | 544 S. Bedford Street, Georgetown

Mini Med 2018 On YouTube!

Did you miss 2018’s Mini Medical School? Watch it on YouTube!

The 2018 Mini Medical School program, a collaboration between the Delaware Academy of Medicine and Christiana Care Health System, concluded in April, with six lectures and hundreds of eager-to-learn attendees. For the first time in the annual program’s history, the lectures have been captured on video and are now available for viewing on YouTube.

Watch here!

Smartphone CPR App in New Castle County

Leaders in New Castle County, Delaware, have launched a new smartphone application they say will save lives when help is urgently needed.

Activated when a call is made to 911, the PulsePoint app alerts and directs trained residents to people nearby who need cardiopulmonary resuscitation or CPR. County Executive Matt Meyer said citizen responders, who include off-duty first responders, can make all the difference in those critical moments before first responders arrive.

Learn more

Christiana Care Medical Aid Units

Five Christiana Care Medical Aid Units (CCMAU) are now available for convenient care, 7 days a week! Most are open from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm, and no appointment is necessary.  Express Check-In (available on christianacare.org) enables people to see current wait times and reserve their spot in line.

When you should go:

If you have an illness or injury that are NOT extremely serious or life-threatening, but DO require care within a few hours or the same day
(game day sports injuries, sore throats & coughs, eye & ear problems, minor burns, flu-like symptoms, etc.)

5 Convenient MAU Locations

Star Campus
550 South College Avenue
Suite 115
Newark, DE 19713
302-533-7148

Smyrna Health & Wellness Center
100 S. Main Street
Smyrna, DE 19977
302-659-4444

Glasgow Medical Center
2600 Glasgow Avenue
Newark, DE 19702
302-836-8350

Middletown Care Center
124 Sleepy Hollow Drive
Middletown, DE 19709
302-449-3100

HealthCare Center at Christiana
200 Hygeia Drive
Newark, DE 19713
302-623-0444

Innovative Discoveries Series

Geriatric Low Back Pain: Managing Influences, Experiences, and Consequences

The overarching goal of our research program is to improve physical function and participation in older adults with chronic musculoskeletal conditions, particularly low back pain (LBP). Despite the fact that LBP is a common problem for older adults and is associated with poor outcomes in this vulnerable age group, little research has focused on LBP in people over age 65. With minimal research available, clinicians do not have clear evidence-based guidance regarding management of older adults with LBP.  This presentation will focus on our pathway towards developing a focused treatment algorithm designed to prevent and address the pain-related disability found in older adults with LBP. Our work has largely focused on the identification of potentially modifiable “rehabilitation risk factors” that are associated with functional limitations, as well as the development of interventions to address these risk factors. Specifically, we will discuss our findings relative to trunk muscle impairments, clinical hip impairments and energetic impairments in the context of the older adult with chronic low back pain.

Presented By:

Gregory E. Hicks, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Chair and Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware”
Associate Editor; The Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences
Editorial Board; Pain Medicine

Free!  Lunch will be served!

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Friday, March 1, 2019
Noon to 1 p.m.
In-person: Christiana Hospital,Room 1100
Online: Watch live at https://bluejeans.com/361095905
Or join meeting ID 361095905 on the BlueJeans app on your smartphone or tablet

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

Upcoming Lectures:

March 15, 2019: Diet and Vascular Function

Delaware Mini Medical School

Designed for individuals who want to gain a deeper understanding of the world of medicine, Mini-Medical School is a free, six-week series of lectures for adults of all ages and high school students co-sponsored with Christiana Care Health System. Attendees learn about important trends in diagnosing and treating illness and …

Statement on Vaccines

Vaccines Continue to be Tested and Proven Safe

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2017). American Academy of Pediatrics Emphasizes Safety and Importance of Vaccines. Retrieved from https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/American-Academy-of-Pediatrics-Emphasizes-Safety-and-Importance-of-Vaccines.aspx

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016). Infant Immunizations FAQs. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html

Institute of Medicine. (2004). Immunization Safety Review: Vaccines and Autism. Retrieved from https://www.nap.edu/catalog/10997/immunization-safety-review-vaccines-and-autism

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2015).  Thimerosal in Vaccines: Questions and Answers. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/QuestionsaboutVaccines/UCM070430#q5

In light of recent claims by politicians or appointees that vaccines are linked to autism, or are unsafe when administered according to the recommended schedule, or contain dangerous products like Thimerosal, the public health community and the Delaware Academy of Medicine/Delaware Public Health Association continue to come down on the side of science.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research is responsible for regulating vaccines in the United States.  Before a vaccine can be licensed for public use, it must be tested for safety in the laboratory, in animals, and in human clinical trials.  Human clinical trials include looking for common adverse events in a few participants (phase 1), several hundred volunteers looking for local reactions and general side effects like fever (phase 2), and establishing the effectiveness of the vaccine and determining less common side effects with thousands of participants (phase 3).  If a vaccine is to be given at the same time as another vaccine, the two vaccines are tested together (FDA, 2015).  If a dangerous effect is found, that vaccine is not licensed for public use.

Vaccines are continuously monitored following licensure by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), which is run by both the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).  The VAERS is a national system that collects all reports of adverse events following vaccination.  Phase 4 clinical studies are also conducted to further evaluate the new vaccine, and population based studies are conducted through the use of databases like the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) for the lifetime of the use of the vaccine (FDA, 2015).

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Immunization Safety Review Committee “favors rejection of a causal relationship between thimerosal-containing vaccines and autism” (IOM, 2004).  Despite this finding, “all vaccines routinely recommended for children 6 years of age or younger and marketed in the U.S. contain no thimerosal or only trace amounts” (FDA, 2015).

“Infants and young children who follow immunization schedules that spread out shots – or leave out shots – are at risk of developing diseases during the time that shots are delayed” (CDC, 2016). Vaccines “keep communities healthy, and protect some of the most vulnerable in our society” (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2017).  The Delaware Academy of Medicine will continue to advocate for vaccines and vaccine use in the state of Delaware and the United States.