DHSA and DIMER: Partnerships & Progress for Delawareans

December 16, 2019

For nearly 20 years, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) has served as the official osteopathic medical school of Delaware—a state that currently does not have its own medical school—through its partnership with the Delaware Institute of Medical Education and Research (DIMER). The organization provides funding to the College to deliver medical education to Delaware residents, in the hopes that those students will return to practice after graduation.

PCOM and DIMER recently celebrated their relationship, and the 50th anniversary of DIMER, with a dinner honoring Sherman Townsend, board chair of DIMER and honorary degree recipient from PCOM; alumnus and PCOM Board Member Vincent Lobo, DO ’65, who was instrumental in facilitating the partnership between DIMER and PCOM; and Omar Khan, MD, MHS, president and CEO of the Delaware Health Sciences Alliance—of which PCOM is a member institution.

“By partnering with DIMER for these many years, PCOM has been able to provide high-quality medical education for individuals with a passion for healthcare, who may not have otherwise been able to receive it,” said Deborah Benvenger, chief admissions officer at PCOM. “It is our hope that these caring, competent students will return to their home state to serve their hometown communities.”

Read the article here.

During the evening, DHSA President and CEO Omar Khan, MD, MHS, discussed the relationship between DHSA and DIMER.  That presentation can be found here.

Second Annual JeffX Global Health Conference

Join the Global Health Student Consortium for the 2nd Annual JEFFx Global Health Conference!

WHEN: Friday, January 24, 2020 from 3:00 – 8:30 pm
WHERE: Hamilton Building, Thomas Jefferson University
1001 Locust Street, Philadelphia PA

This year’s conference will center around the theme of planetary health, and will include a keynote address, interactive workshop sessions, a networking dinner, and a reception! For more information and to register, please complete this registration form. Feel free to contact GHSC@jefferson.edu with any questions. We hope to see you there!

KEYNOTE: Dr. Jo Ivey Boufford, MD, President, International Society for Urban Health; Clinical Professor, Global Public Health, New York University; Clinical Professor, Pediatrics, NYU School of Medicine.

DPH PRESENTS 2019 STATE HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN PROGRESS REPORT

 

DOVER (October 23, 2019) – Today, the Division of Public Health (DPH), along with state and community partners, hosted its annual stakeholder meeting to discuss the Delaware State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) and present the 2019 annual SHIP report. The report serves as an update on progress made and identifies to what degree, DPH and its stakeholders and partners are aligned with the SHIP’s priority areas. 

 

The purpose of the State Health Improvement Plan is to describe how DPH and the community it serves will work together to improve the health of Delaware’s population. Communities, stakeholders, and partners can use the SHIP to set priorities, direct the use of resources, and develop and implement projects, programs and policies. The SHIP’s four priority areas, identified through a State Health Needs Assessment (SHNA) process, are: chronic disease, maternal and child health, substance use disorder and mental health.

 

“The Delaware State Health Improvement Plan is more comprehensive than the roles and responsibilities of the health department alone, and depends on the participation of a broad set of community stakeholders and partners,” said DPH Director Dr. Karyl Rattay. “These community members have done an outstanding job to improve health by aligning efforts and investments in projects, programs and policies.”

 

The SHIP process follows a five-year action cycle; the most recent SHIP began in 2015 to 2016, with the needs assessment. Wednesday’s annual SHIP meeting brought together stakeholders for the first time since working on the assessment, and provided an opportunity for attendees to discuss progress made this past year, as well as identify gaps. The 2019 SHIP Report discusses which recommendations have the greatest degrees of alignment with stakeholder efforts, and where more work is needed. The 2019 SHIP Annual Report is available on DelawareSHIP.org, which has an updated resources section and an updated look.

 

The report shows that there is substantial alignment underway across each of the Delaware SHIP priority areas, with the greatest emphasis seen in the area of chronic disease. The greatest degree of alignment was observed in “making the healthy choice the easy choice”; the least amount of alignment is occurring around efforts to increase the number of Medicaid dental providers in underserved areas. In the area of maternal and child health, stakeholder groups are more aligned to promote health education and emphasize healthy parenting in schools than they are around efforts to incorporate graduated levels for health education in schools. In addressing substance use disorder, stakeholder groups are in strong alignment to reduce substance use disorders overall, and are particularly focused on opioid use disorder. Less alignment is seen around reducing tobacco and tobacco substitute use; however, the passage and signing of Senate Bill 25 in 2019, which raised the minimum age to buy tobacco and vape products from 18 to 21, is a sign of great progress.  

 

In the area of mental health, stakeholders are most aligned around improving access to behavioral and mental health services, with less alignment found around providing each school with a trained mental health provider. However, efforts to help fund and/or expand these type of services are underway through the FY2020 state budget and federal grants. The needs assessment also determined that none of these recommendations can or should be implemented separately. To receive the biggest benefit, the Delaware SHIP recommends a policy, systems and environmental (PSE) approach. System-wide, stakeholders have promoted health in all policies, engaged in social marketing campaigns, and addressed social determinants of health. 

 

In 2021, the SHIP’s partners will participate in another needs assessment, which will lead to the publication of the next SHIP in 2023. 

 

Implementation of the SHIP project involves a collaboration between DPH, the Partnership for Healthy Communities at the University of Delaware and the Delaware Academy of Medicine/Delaware Public Health Association. Other stakeholder groups include hospitals, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), health-focused groups, coalitions, and research and education institutions. As part of the SHIP’s five-year action cycle, DPH conducts a periodic review process that helps the agency understand the needs of the community, identify gaps in services, and respond to emerging and continuous trends in health and well-being.

 

Dr. Kara Odom Walker, Secretary

Jill Fredel, Director of Communications

302-255-9047, Cell 302-357-7498

Email:  jill.fredel@delaware.gov

 

DPH Media Contact:
Jennifer Brestel
302-744-4907, Cell 302-612-6223
Email: 
jennifer.brestel@delaware.gov

FLU IS NOW CONFIRMED STATEWIDE; DPH ANNOUNCES FIRST FLU CASES IN KENT AND SUSSEX COUNTIES FOR THE 2019-2020 SEASON

DOVER (Oct. 14, 2019) – The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) is reporting the state’s first laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza in Kent and Sussex counties, for the 2019-2020 flu season. The Kent County case involves a 26-year-old female, while the Sussex County case involves a 7-year-old male. This brings the total number of flu cases this season to three. The first confirmed flu case for New Castle County was announced last week. There are two main types of influenza (flu) virus – types A and B – that routinely spread in people and are responsible for seasonal flu outbreaks each year. All three lab-confirmed influenza cases were type B.

 

“With flu cases confirmed in all three counties, we are urging Delawareans not to delay getting their flu vaccine,” said DPH Director Dr. Karyl Rattay. “Vaccination is not just about protecting yourself, it’s also about protecting your children who are quite vulnerable to effects of the flu, other family members and those with whom you work.” Vaccinations not only prevent people from getting the flu, but they can reduce the severity of flu illness and prevent visits to the doctor, clinic, emergency room and hospitalizations. Vaccinated people also have less chance of missing family, school and work events due to influenza illness.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced last week concerning national numbers that show only about half (54%) of pregnant women surveyed report getting a flu vaccine either before or during pregnancy.  When pregnant women are vaccinated they pass on antibodies to the fetus that provide protection after birth, during the time babies are too young to be vaccinated. Newborns who get influenza or whooping cough are at high risk of hospitalization and death. Additionally, pregnant women have more than double the risk of hospitalization compared to non-pregnant women of childbearing age if they get influenza. The CDC and DPH recommend that expectant mothers be up-to-date with recommended vaccinations as part of their routine prenatal care.

 

The flu vaccine is recommended for Delawareans 6 months of age and older. Since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies that protect against influenza virus infection to develop in the body, it is important to get vaccinated as early as possible to give your body time to build immunity. DPH will offer various flu clinics throughout the season. A schedule can be found at https://dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/fluclinics.html. Flu vaccines also are offered through physician offices, many pharmacies and some grocery stores. To locate where flu vaccines near you are being offered, Google “CDC flu finder” and enter a ZIP code.

 

Getting the flu vaccine now also will provide protection during the entire flu season. During the 2018-2019 flu season, Delaware recorded 6,387 laboratory-confirmed flu cases. More than 1,000 Delawareans were hospitalized due to the flu and 24 people died from flu complications.

 

The flu is easy to transmit and you can get it even from seemingly healthy, but unvaccinated, children and adults. Children, older adults, pregnant women and those who have chronic underlying medical conditions are most at-risk for complications from the flu and are strongly encouraged to get vaccinated now.

 

In addition to getting an annual flu vaccine, Delawareans can prevent the spread of the flu and other respiratory illness with good hygiene: Wash hands frequently with soap and water or use alcohol-based hand sanitizers, cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, and dispose of tissues immediately. If a tissue is not available, cough or sneeze into your inner elbow. Droplets from a sneeze can travel up to six feet. Also avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Keep your distance from people who are coughing or sneezing.

 

Flu symptoms come on suddenly, and include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, headaches and body aches, chills and fatigue. Some people get complications including pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinus and ear infections. Those sick with the flu should stay home from work, school and other gatherings and not return until they have been free of fever – with a temperature of less than 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C), without the use of fever-reducing medications – for at least 24 hours.

 

People with flu symptoms should avoid close contact with well people in the household and stay well-hydrated by drinking plenty of water and other clear liquids. Over-the-counter medicines can provide symptom relief, but if you suspect you have influenza, call your doctor as they may decide to provide antiviral medications to help hasten recovery and prevent serious complications. This is particularly important for those who feel very sick, are pregnant or have chronic medical conditions.

 

For more information about the flu and where to get vaccinated, visit flu.delaware.gov or call 1-800-282-8672.

 

Dr. Kara Odom Walker, Secretary

Jill Fredel, Director of Communications

302-255-9047, Cell 302-357-7498

Email:  jill.fredel@delaware.gov

 

DPH Media Contact:
Jennifer Brestel
302-744-4907, Cell 302-612-6223
Email: 
Jennifer.brestel@delaware.gov

Surgeon General’s Message on the Current Measles Outbreaks

Dear Partners,

The Nation’s Doctor would like to share a very important message with you about the current measles outbreaks occurring throughout our country.

Measles is a highly-contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Measles starts with a fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and sore throat, and is followed by a rash that spreads all over the body.

Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 9 out of 10 people around that person will also become infected if they’re not yet vaccinated. You can get measles just by being in a room where a person with measles has been, even up to two hours after that person has left.  And what is even more worrisome is that an infected person can spread measles to others even before the infected person develops symptoms—from four days before they develop the measles rash through four days afterwards.

The good news is that measles can be prevented with the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine.

The MMR vaccine has an excellent safety record and is highly effective. It is one of the most effective vaccines we have in our country.

Surgeon General Adams hopes you will share his message with your networks. It’s up to us to protect the health of our communities.

For more information, please visit CDC.gov

Office of the Surgeon General

Delaware Mini Medical School

Designed for individuals who want to gain a deeper understanding of the world of medicine, Mini-Medical School is a free, six-week series of lectures for adults of all ages and high school students co-sponsored with ChristianaCare.

Attendees learn about important trends in diagnosing and treating illness and general health topics. Faculty will provide in-depth lectures and allow time for questions to enhance the experience. There are no tests or grades. No previous medical training is required. Participants who attend all six sessions will receive a Certificate of Achievement.

Light refreshments will be served.

Pre-registration is required.

2020 Mini-Med Lecture Schedule

Week 1. Special Health Care Needs – Making the Transition to Adulthood for those with Special Needs

Thursday, February 27, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 2. Kidney Transplant: Preparation by the Donor and Recipient

Thursday, March 5, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 3. Psychological Assessment: Tools and Methods for Understanding Our Behaviors

Thursday, March 12, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 4. The Evolution of the Nurse Practitioner & Physicans Assistant Role in Medicine

Thursday, March 19, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 5. The New Field of Immunotherapy

Thursday, March 26, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 6. Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders

Thursday, April 2, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Seating is limited. Register online or call 800-693-CARE (2273).

January Awareness

January is…

Cervical Health Awareness Month – https://www.cancerhealth.com/event/national-cervical-cancer-awareness-month-2020
National Birth Defects Prevention Month – https://www.nbdpn.org/bdpm.php
National Glaucoma Awareness Month – http://www.glaucoma.org/news/glaucoma-awareness-month.php
Thyroid Awareness Month – http://www.thyroid.org/january-thyroid-awareness/

The Week of…

January 5 – 11: National Folic Acid Awareness Week – http://www.nbdpn.org/faaw.php

The Day of…

Jan 16: Women’s Healthy Weight Day – https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/womens-healthy-weight-day/
Jan 20: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service – https://www.nationalservice.gov/mlkday
Jan 30: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Awareness Day – http://stopcte.org/events/

Innovative Discoveries Series

Elucidating modifiable risk factors for adverse prostate cancer outcomes and strategies for improving survival

Although prostate cancer has a high overall survival rate, it remains a disease of disparities with few established risk factors beyond age, family history, and race. However, there is growing focus on modifiable risk factors. This talk will examine modifiable risk factors for adverse prostate cancer outcomes throughout the cancer continuum. Specifically, research examining the association between weight gain, obesity, smoking, and diabetes and adverse prostate cancer outcomes including prostate cancer aggressiveness, progression, and mortality will be discussed. Finally, ongoing research, utilizing national VA data, examining the chemotherapeutic potential of metformin and satins to improve survival outcomes in men with prostate cancer will be highlighted.

Presented By:

Saira Khan, PhD, MPH

Assistant Professor, Epidemiology, College of Health Sciences, University of Delaware

Free!  Lunch will be served!

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Friday, January 24, 2020
Noon to 1 p.m.
In-person: Christiana Hospital, Ammon Center, Room 14
Online: Watch live at https://bluejeans.com/361095905
Or join meeting ID 361095905 on the BlueJeans app on your smartphone or tablet

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

Upcoming Lectures:

January 30, 2020: From Public Health to Population Health

CCHS Global Health Residency Track

GLOBAL HEALTH SERIES

Please join us for this month’s global health talk!
The Global Health Residency Tracks of Christiana Care Health System, in partnership with the Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association, are pleased to invite you to this month’s global health talk.

Thursday, January 30, 2020
5:30 – 6:30 pm
LIVE: Christiana Hospital, Main Building, Room 1000

Adventures in Global Health – Lessons from the Field.

Dr. Khan has worked on the Global Polio Eradication Program with the World Health Organization, on HIV/AIDS in South Asia, and more broadly on leading global health education and collaboration initiatives for the last 2 decades.  He is Editor-in-Chief of the Delaware Journal of Public Health, and has authored over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. He has authored or co-authored 4 books in the area of global health, including ‘Readings in Global Health’ co-edited with Sir Michael Marmot; ‘The End of Polio?’ with Tim Brookes; and ‘Megacities & Global Health’ co-edited with Dr. Gregory Pappas. He serves in leadership roles for the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and the American Public Health Association.

His talk will focus on key lessons learned from global health work including the links between geopolitics, development, and health.

Speakers:
Omar Khan, MD, MHS, FAACP

REGISTER ONLINE

The CCHS Global Health Curriculum is an interdepartmental collaboration, supporting the Global Health Tracks in the Depts. of Medicine and Family Medicine, and the Med-Peds Residency, with the support of the Delaware Academy of Medicine, Delaware Public Health Association, and Delaware Academy of Family Physicians.

All are welcome to attend this talk.  Global Health Curriculum residents are required to attend.  There is no charge to attend this event, but registration is required. Food and Refreshments will be served.

Images from the 89th Annual Meeting of the Academy/DPHA

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Trauma Informed Delaware

In October, 2018, Governor Carney signed Executive Order 24, making Delaware a trauma-informed state.  This order directs the Family Services Cabinet Council to develop tools for training state employees and community partners on the impact of exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), to promote ACE awareness, and to improve services and  interventions for children and families exposed to trauma. The Family Services Cabinet Council is leading efforts to ensure that Delaware becomes a trauma-informed state
by promoting a Trauma Awareness Month in Delaware.

Since that time, First Lady Tracey Quillen Carney has brought together a variety of partners to launch Trauma Informed Delaware (TID), a statewide public-private-nonprofit coalition. The goal is to coordinate a sustainable, community-based trauma awareness, prevention, and early intervention system that advances resilience through:
• Access to quality behavioral and integrated health care
• Strength-based services for youth and adults
• Education for providers and the community