Delaware Mini Medical School Podcast on WDEL

Dr. Omar Khan, President of the Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association was interviewed by WDEL regarding the 10th Anniversary of the Delaware Mini Medical School series. Mini Medical School is a collaboration of the Christiana Care Health System and the Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware …

Surgeon General’s Message on the Current Measles Outbreaks

Dear Partners,

The Nation’s Doctor would like to share a very important message with you about the current measles outbreaks occurring throughout our country.

Measles is a highly-contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Measles starts with a fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and sore throat, and is followed by a rash that spreads all over the body.

Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 9 out of 10 people around that person will also become infected if they’re not yet vaccinated. You can get measles just by being in a room where a person with measles has been, even up to two hours after that person has left.  And what is even more worrisome is that an infected person can spread measles to others even before the infected person develops symptoms—from four days before they develop the measles rash through four days afterwards.

The good news is that measles can be prevented with the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine.

The MMR vaccine has an excellent safety record and is highly effective. It is one of the most effective vaccines we have in our country.

Surgeon General Adams hopes you will share his message with your networks. It’s up to us to protect the health of our communities.

For more information, please visit CDC.gov

Office of the Surgeon General

in memoriam – LTG William Herbert Duncan, MD (DE NG Ret.)

 LTG WILLIAM H. DUNCAN. M.D.

18 February 1930 – 19 December 2018

Authored by Joseph Kestner MD; Past-President (2006-2008) and current Board member, Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association

Bill was a native Delawarean hailing from New Castle.  He attended the William Penn High School and graduated from the PS DuPont High School in Wilmington.  After a year at the University of Delaware he entered the U.S. Military Academy by means of a competitive appointment as the son of a deceased veteran of WW II.  Following graduation from West Point in 1952 and some training which included jump school he was sent to Korea as an infantry lieutenant.  At the completion of his military obligation he entered Temple University Medical School graduating in 1959.  An internship at the Delaware Hospital followed.  Bill then opened a family medicine practice at Foulk and Silverside Roads in North Wilmington.  Shortly thereafter Bill was appointed the part time supervisor of the Delaware Hospital ER.  Following the merger of the Delaware, Memorial and Wilmington General Hospitals, Bill became the director of ambulatory and emergency services of the Wilmington Medical Center, a full time position.  In 1975 Bill was appointed vice president for medical affairs at St. Francis Hospital

This is when I first met Bill.   He and I interacted on the credentials committee where applications to join the medical staff were reviewed and evaluated.  On occasion there was controversy.  Bill always valued the perspective of the committee members. Bill was also a source of advice on dealing with hospital administrators.  If there was an adverse event or unexpected death (prior to review committees) Bill would be on the phone wanting to know the details.  As an examiner for the FAA and air traffic controllers he would follow up on patients he referred.  We worked together on nominating committees where he was transparent and open to advice and suggestions.  Bill retired from St. Francis in 1993.

All during this time Bill was active in the PA and later the DE National Guard eventually as commanding officer of the 116th Surgical Hospital (Mobile Army) and later as commander of the 261st Signal Command.  During his military career Bill served in three branches of the army:  Infantry, Medical Corps and Signal Corps.  He retired from the National Guard in 1987 receiving many recognitions and awards.  Bill was appointed a charter member of the Army Historical Foundation.  His lifelong interest in the military also continued with the Delaware National Guard Heritage Committee and the Delaware Military Museum.

Bill was the 19th president of the Delaware Academy of Medicine in 1976 and 77.  He was chairman of the planning committee for the Academy’s 50th anniversary celebration in 1980.  This three day event included cultural, educational and social activities.  Some notable speakers included Isaac Asimov, Ph.D., Eli Ginsberg, Ph.D., and Edmond Pelligrino, M.D.  Bill believed his most significant accomplishment while president of the Academy was to stabilize a precarious financial situation.

Bill was an author.  His Founders of the Medical Society of Delaware, was published in 2017.  He was working on a biography of James Tilton, M.D., a founder of the Medical Society of Delaware and its 1st president at the time of his death.  He documented the service of Delaware Physician Veterans of WW II (1994) and the Korean War (2000) in the Delaware Medical Journal.  His most recent effort, the Contemporary Veterans Project published in the Delaware Medical Journal in Nov-Dec 2018 was to recognize the service of those Delaware Physician Veterans post Korean War.  This is where Bill and I reconnected.  It was my honor to assist Bill in completing this project and identifying every possible Delaware physician veteran post Korean War.  This collaboration was interesting, rewarding and fun – all because of Bill Duncan.

Bill was a leader.  He was open, transparent, articulate and he listened.  He had a vision of what was to be accomplished.  He led infantry units, medical services, the St. Francis Hospital Medical Staff, Temple University Alumni, a U.S. Army Mobile Surgical Hospital and Signal Battalion, the Medical Society of Delaware and the Delaware Academy of Medicine.  One thing to recognize is whatever Bill did – he did well.

He would on occasion speak of his Dad, a soldier and veteran of WW I and WW II who died when Bill was quite young.  I can just imagine what Bill’s Dad might say if he was here today, “Well done, son.  Mission accomplished.”

Ted Kestner, M.D.

To see an interview of Bill Duncan, MD, taped in 2012, click here

Lt. Governor’s Challenge

Lt. Governor Bethany Hall-Long invites you to join the celebration as the state of Delaware kicks off the Lt. Governor’s Challenge — an ongoing opportunity for Delawareans to embrace healthier living, inspire their peers and be recognized for their achievements. More than a recognition program for health and wellness initiatives, the Lt. Governor’s Challenge is an opportunity for everyone to drive change and to elevate the well-being, productivity, and prosperity among communities in our state!

The Kickoff Celebration is a free public event, open to all individuals and groups in Delaware that are passionate about improving physical and emotional health through individual and communal activities.

When: Thursday, October 25 from 2:00 – 3:00 pm
Where: DE TURF Sports Complex | 4000 Bay Road | Frederica, DE 19946
Find the flyer here!

Kickoff Highlights

  • Remarks by the Lt. Governor!
  • Official reveal of the Lt. Governor’s Challenge vision and platform!
  • Preview of the Lt. Governor’s Challenge nomination and resource website!
  • Networking with state leaders in health and well-being!

Please RSVP by October 23 to info@ltgovernorschallenge.org

Flu Season

2018-2019 Flu Season

Check out the Division of Public Health’s Bulletin – Special Flu Edition to learn more about the flu.

Numerous flu clinics are scheduled across Delaware.  To find them:

Department of Public Health Flu Clinics

New Castle County

  • Monday to Friday | 8:15 am – 11:30 am | Hudson State Service Center | 501 Ogletown Road, Newark
  • Monday to Friday | 8:15 am – 11:30 am | Porter State Service Center | 509 W. 8th Street, Wilmington

Kent County

  • Monday (1:00 pm – 3:00 pm) & Wednesday (9:00 am – 11:00 am) | Milford State Service Center | 253 NE Front Street, Milford (By Appointment Only)
  • Monday to Thursday | 8:00 am – 3:30 pm | Williams State Service Center | 805 River Road, Dover (By Appointment Only)

Sussex County

  • Monday – Friday| 8:30 am – 4:00 pm | Shipley State Service Center | 350 Virginia Avenue, Seaford
  • Thursdays | 9:00 am – 11:00 am | Adams State Service Center | 544 S. Bedford Street, Georgetown

Delaware Journal of Public Health Covered in the APHA Nation’s Health Newspaper

We are honored to have been interviewed and included in the July issue of The Nation’s Health, in an article titled:

Affiliate journals advance health research, collaboration: Field practice garnering publication

Executive Director and publisher, Tim Gibbs, and Deputy Editor, Liz Healy, are quoted in the article which you can read here:

http://thenationshealth.aphapublications.org/content/48/5/17.1.full?ijkey=4ftC0maqDf1PA&keytype=ref&siteid=nathealth

The Nation’s Health is the monthly newspaper of the American Public Health Association, a source of news from and for the public health field. The newspaper covers issues of interest to public health professionals, including news on federal, state and local public health policy; developments and trends in public health science and practice; global health issues; research findings; and coverage of state and local health departments.

 

Mini Med 2018 On YouTube!

Did you miss 2018’s Mini Medical School? Watch it on YouTube!

The 2018 Mini Medical School program, a collaboration between the Delaware Academy of Medicine and Christiana Care Health System, concluded in April, with six lectures and hundreds of eager-to-learn attendees. For the first time in the annual program’s history, the lectures have been captured on video and are now available for viewing on YouTube.

Watch here!

A Moment With Our New President, Dr. Omar Khan

For someone who has no idea how to answer the question ‘where do you see yourself in 5 years’, it is difficult to comprehend the magnitude of 88 years.  That’s the length of time the Delaware Academy of Medicine has been around. I joined not because of this history, but because of what the foundation established by this history meant for the future.  I joined when my friend and colleague Dr. Arun Malhotra collared me in the parking lot of the Academy office (part of the Christiana Hospital campus) and suggested I do so.  Not being a joiner by nature, I still agreed to be part of this group which my smart and dynamic colleague belonged to. I discovered there other smart, dynamic colleagues, keenly interested in quite an unusual question: how to continuously be relevant to the membership, to the community, to Delaware- even if it meant challenging and reinventing one’s mission.

Over the last 10 years I have had the privilege of learning from the finest leaders from medicine, dentistry, public health, nursing, social sciences, and indeed all disciplines connected with the health sciences.  Your Delaware Academy of Medicine has grown to encompass the broadest possible mission of serving health by also becoming the Delaware Public Health Association (DPHA).  We have formed partnerships with all those interested in the same as us: serving and improving the health of our community.

I am incredibly grateful to the leadership of Dr. Dan Meara, a scholar, gentleman and friend.  His steady leadership and wisdom over the last few years have been instrumental in maintaining our strength.  Our incredible Board- which is really 2 Boards, that of the Academy of Medicine, and the Advisory Council of the DPHA- deserve our heartfelt thanks for volunteering on behalf of the Delaware community to keep our work on track.

The staff of the Academy are a well-kept secret, which I intend to make less well-kept during my tenure. They are an exceptional team, comprising Tim Gibbs (Executive Director), Kate Smith, Elizabeth Lenz, Elizabeth Healy- all of whom put together our diverse programming from Mini Medical School to the University of Delaware’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute; plan, edit, and published the acclaimed and popular Delaware Journal of Public Health; administer student loans for medical and dental students; host a continual stream of student interns; optimize our partner relationships; keep us on sound financial footing – and oh yes, spend most waking minutes thinking about new and innovative ways to do what we do.  It’s an always-exhilarating (occasionally exhausting J) place to work.

And that is just the local work. Add to that our leadership role in the American Public Health Association, partnership with the National Academy of Medicine and Fogarty International Center of the NIH; and extensive national involvement in various national organizations on the part of our Board and Advisory Council Members. We truly Think Locally and Act Globally.

Some of the best moments in caring for others is getting to know one’s colleagues.  As the practice environment has changed, as have we.  Fewer community physicians come to the hospital, yet the health systems are now more engaged in the health of communities. I see incredible possibilities for collaboration ahead- for delivering increasing value to our patients and communities. And it remains rooted in the power of relationships- the unique Delaware way of accomplishing important tasks through the personal touch.

Over the next couple of years, I hope to get to know as many of you as possible, and I hope you will do likewise.  Our team is embedded in the fabric of all you do and those you serve.  My bio is here, and closeby you will find profiles of all our Board Members.

This space is intended as a place for dialogue – for con khan-versation.  Having suffered through countless ‘Wrath of Khan’ jokes since 1982, I figured it’s my turn.   So, talk to us. Tell us what you like, what you’d like us to be, where you’d like us to go. What would you like us to do the next 88 years?  Keep it interesting, fun, constructive.  That’s the plan.  Let’s drive!