CDC Public Health Grand Rounds

The Emerging Role of Pathogen Genomics in Public Health

Tuesday, January 21, 2020
1:00 pm ET
Watch in person (Global Communications Center, Building 19), or live via webcast.

 

The Advanced Molecular Detection (AMD) Program, established by Congress in 2013, has led the adaptation and deployment of novel laboratory technologies, namely next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics, in the US public health system. AMD technologies are now in use across the range of infectious diseases of public health importance, such as bacterial foodborne illness, tuberculosis, influenza, malaria and Legionnaires’ Disease. This session of Public Health Grand Rounds will address the rapid advances in AMD, how these technologies are being applied in public health, and their future uses.

 

Previous Grand Rounds

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Innovative Discoveries Series

Elucidating modifiable risk factors for adverse prostate cancer outcomes and strategies for improving survival

Although prostate cancer has a high overall survival rate, it remains a disease of disparities with few established risk factors beyond age, family history, and race. However, there is growing focus on modifiable risk factors. This talk will examine modifiable risk factors for adverse prostate cancer outcomes throughout the cancer continuum. Specifically, research examining the association between weight gain, obesity, smoking, and diabetes and adverse prostate cancer outcomes including prostate cancer aggressiveness, progression, and mortality will be discussed. Finally, ongoing research, utilizing national VA data, examining the chemotherapeutic potential of metformin and satins to improve survival outcomes in men with prostate cancer will be highlighted.

Presented By:

Saira Khan, PhD, MPH

Assistant Professor, Epidemiology, College of Health Sciences, University of Delaware

Free!  Lunch will be served!

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Friday, January 24, 2020
Noon to 1 p.m.
In-person: Christiana Hospital, Ammon Center, Room 14
Online: Watch live at https://bluejeans.com/361095905
Or join meeting ID 361095905 on the BlueJeans app on your smartphone or tablet

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

Upcoming Lectures:

January 30, 2020: From Public Health to Population Health

Delaware Mini Medical School

Designed for individuals who want to gain a deeper understanding of the world of medicine, Mini-Medical School is a free, six-week series of lectures for adults of all ages and high school students co-sponsored with ChristianaCare.

Attendees learn about important trends in diagnosing and treating illness and general health topics. Faculty will provide in-depth lectures and allow time for questions to enhance the experience. There are no tests or grades. No previous medical training is required. Participants who attend all six sessions will receive a Certificate of Achievement.

Light refreshments will be served.

Pre-registration is required.

2020 Mini-Med Lecture Schedule

Week 1. Special Health Care Needs – Making the Transition to Adulthood for those with Special Needs

Thursday, February 27, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 2. Kidney Transplant: Preparation by the Donor and Recipient

Thursday, March 5, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 3. Psychological Assessment: Tools and Methods for Understanding Our Behaviors

Thursday, March 12, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 4. The Evolution of the Nurse Practitioner & Physicans Assistant Role in Medicine

Thursday, March 19, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 5. The New Field of Immunotherapy

Thursday, March 26, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Week 6. Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders

Thursday, April 2, 2020
Registration – 6:30 p.m., Lecture – 7 to 9 p.m.

 

Seating is limited. Register online or call 800-693-CARE (2273).

Statement on Vaccines

Vaccines Continue to be Tested and Proven Safe

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2017). American Academy of Pediatrics Emphasizes Safety and Importance of Vaccines. Retrieved from https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/American-Academy-of-Pediatrics-Emphasizes-Safety-and-Importance-of-Vaccines.aspx

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016). Infant Immunizations FAQs. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html

Institute of Medicine. (2004). Immunization Safety Review: Vaccines and Autism. Retrieved from https://www.nap.edu/catalog/10997/immunization-safety-review-vaccines-and-autism

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2015).  Thimerosal in Vaccines: Questions and Answers. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/QuestionsaboutVaccines/UCM070430#q5

In light of recent claims by politicians or appointees that vaccines are linked to autism, or are unsafe when administered according to the recommended schedule, or contain dangerous products like Thimerosal, the public health community and the Delaware Academy of Medicine/Delaware Public Health Association continue to come down on the side of science.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research is responsible for regulating vaccines in the United States.  Before a vaccine can be licensed for public use, it must be tested for safety in the laboratory, in animals, and in human clinical trials.  Human clinical trials include looking for common adverse events in a few participants (phase 1), several hundred volunteers looking for local reactions and general side effects like fever (phase 2), and establishing the effectiveness of the vaccine and determining less common side effects with thousands of participants (phase 3).  If a vaccine is to be given at the same time as another vaccine, the two vaccines are tested together (FDA, 2015).  If a dangerous effect is found, that vaccine is not licensed for public use.

Vaccines are continuously monitored following licensure by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), which is run by both the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).  The VAERS is a national system that collects all reports of adverse events following vaccination.  Phase 4 clinical studies are also conducted to further evaluate the new vaccine, and population based studies are conducted through the use of databases like the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) for the lifetime of the use of the vaccine (FDA, 2015).

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Immunization Safety Review Committee “favors rejection of a causal relationship between thimerosal-containing vaccines and autism” (IOM, 2004).  Despite this finding, “all vaccines routinely recommended for children 6 years of age or younger and marketed in the U.S. contain no thimerosal or only trace amounts” (FDA, 2015).

“Infants and young children who follow immunization schedules that spread out shots – or leave out shots – are at risk of developing diseases during the time that shots are delayed” (CDC, 2016). Vaccines “keep communities healthy, and protect some of the most vulnerable in our society” (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2017).  The Delaware Academy of Medicine will continue to advocate for vaccines and vaccine use in the state of Delaware and the United States.

January Awareness

January is…

Cervical Health Awareness Month – https://www.cancerhealth.com/event/national-cervical-cancer-awareness-month-2020
National Birth Defects Prevention Month – https://www.nbdpn.org/bdpm.php
National Glaucoma Awareness Month – http://www.glaucoma.org/news/glaucoma-awareness-month.php
Thyroid Awareness Month – http://www.thyroid.org/january-thyroid-awareness/

The Week of…

January 5 – 11: National Folic Acid Awareness Week – http://www.nbdpn.org/faaw.php

The Day of…

Jan 16: Women’s Healthy Weight Day – https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/womens-healthy-weight-day/
Jan 20: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service – https://www.nationalservice.gov/mlkday
Jan 30: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Awareness Day – http://stopcte.org/events/

CCHS Global Health Residency Track

GLOBAL HEALTH SERIES

Please join us for this month’s global health talk!
The Global Health Residency Tracks of Christiana Care Health System, in partnership with the Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association, are pleased to invite you to this month’s global health talk.

Thursday, January 30, 2020
5:30 – 6:30 pm
LIVE: Christiana Hospital, Main Building, Room 1000

Adventures in Global Health – Lessons from the Field.

Dr. Khan has worked on the Global Polio Eradication Program with the World Health Organization, on HIV/AIDS in South Asia, and more broadly on leading global health education and collaboration initiatives for the last 2 decades.  He is Editor-in-Chief of the Delaware Journal of Public Health, and has authored over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. He has authored or co-authored 4 books in the area of global health, including ‘Readings in Global Health’ co-edited with Sir Michael Marmot; ‘The End of Polio?’ with Tim Brookes; and ‘Megacities & Global Health’ co-edited with Dr. Gregory Pappas. He serves in leadership roles for the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and the American Public Health Association.

His talk will focus on key lessons learned from global health work including the links between geopolitics, development, and health.

Speakers:
Omar Khan, MD, MHS, FAACP

REGISTER ONLINE

The CCHS Global Health Curriculum is an interdepartmental collaboration, supporting the Global Health Tracks in the Depts. of Medicine and Family Medicine, and the Med-Peds Residency, with the support of the Delaware Academy of Medicine, Delaware Public Health Association, and Delaware Academy of Family Physicians.

All are welcome to attend this talk.  Global Health Curriculum residents are required to attend.  There is no charge to attend this event, but registration is required. Food and Refreshments will be served.