CCHS Global Health Residency Track

GLOBAL HEALTH SERIES

Please join us for this month’s global health talk!
The Global Health Residency Tracks of Christiana Care Health System, in partnership with the Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association, are pleased to invite you to this month’s global health talk.

Wednesday, September 26, 2018
5:30 – 6:30 pm
LIVE: Ammon Medical Education Center Room 14 (broadcast to Room 2 in the Brandywine Conference Center at Wilmington Hospital).

Making a Killing – Philip Morris, Kraft, and Global Tobacco Addiction

In 2000, long before the pervasive nature of social media had been developed, Philip Morris, Kraft, and many other companies were influencing populations to adopt habits that are proven to have a negative impact on health.  First the award winning movie “Making a Killing,” released in 2000 will be viewed, then we’ll bring things up to speed with current marketing practices around the globe in follow-up discussion.

Recommended background reading:
Big Tobacco Accused of Using Social Media ‘Influencers’ to Target Youth

 

Speaker:
Tim Gibbs, MPH
Executive Director, Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association

REGISTER ONLINE

The CCHS Global Health Curriculum is an interdepartmental collaboration, supporting the Global Health Tracks in the Depts. of Medicine and Family Medicine, and the Med-Peds Residency, with the support of the Delaware Academy of Medicine, Delaware Public Health Association, and Delaware Academy of Family Physicians.

All are welcome to attend this talk.  Global Health Curriculum residents are required to attend.  There is no charge to attend this event, but registration is required. Food and Refreshments will be served.

Future Talks

 

Patient-Centered Engagement Project around Chronic Kidney Disease

Delaware-CKD.org

The Academy/DPHA is partnering with the Christiana Care Value Institute to engage patients (and their support networks) who have Chronic Kidney Disease, End-stage Renal Failure, Nephrotic Syndrome, and who have had kidney transplants. More than 20 million people over the age of 20 in the U.S. have Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Because CKD patients have multiple comorbid conditions, they see numerous healthcare providers. Poor communication between physicians as well as different electronic health records systems can create fragmented patient care, resulting in suboptimal clinical outcomes. Development of a CKD registry in Delaware will join electronic health records of multiple sources to improve coordination of care. A team of patients, clinicians, and researchers are collaborating to gather information and facilitate Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) based on the CKD registry.